Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp



Drone video shows the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp as it is today – 70 years after it was liberated by Soviet troops. The camp in Poland is now maintained as a World Heritage Site and is visited by thousands of tourists and survivors every year. Auschwitz was the largest camp established by the Germans during World War II. More than a million people – the vast majority of them Jews – died there between 1940, when it was built, and 1945, when it was liberated by the Soviet army.

Railway tracks into Auschwitz-Birkenau – Trains filled with victims from throughout occupied Europe arrived at the camp almost every day between 1942 and the summer of 1944.



Ruins of wooden huts at Birkenau – Birkenau (or Auschwitz II) was erected in 1941 solely as a death camp, the wooden huts are now in ruins with only brick fireplaces and chimneys remaining.



Entrance to Auschwitz I -The wrought-iron sign over the entrance bears the words Arbeit Macht Frei – “Work sets you free”.



Auschwitz I – The brick-built buildings were the former cavalry barracks of the Polish Army.



Courtyard between blocks 10 and 11 at Auschwitz I – Block 11 was called “the Block of Death” by prisoners. Executions took place between Block 10 and Block 11 and posts in the yard were used to string up prisoners by their wrists.

The Story Behind the Iconic Soy Sauce Bottle That Hasn’t Changed in Over 50 Years

You probably take it for granted while dining on sushi or dumplings, but that iconic Kikkoman soy sauce dispenser has been in production since 1961. And as the New York Times discovered, it was actually developed by a Japanese Navy sailor who dedicated his life to design when he left the service.

As the story goes, Kenji Ekuan’s younger sister was killed by the Hiroshima atomic blast, while radiation sickness took his father’s life a year later. And after seeing the devastation left by the bomb while riding the train home one day, he decided to dedicate his life to making and designing things. Over his 60 year career he was responsible for many recognizable designs, but none more ubiquitous or iconic than the Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.

Its unique shape took three years and over a hundred prototypes to perfect, but the teardrop design and dripless spout have become a staple of restaurant condiments all around the world. Over 300 million of the bottles have been sold since the design was first introduced, and besides the occasional special edition versions to commemorate anniversaries and other occasions, the bottle’s design hasn’t changed over the past 50 years. So the next time you’re drowning a California roll, stop and remember that you’re also enjoying a piece of history with your meal.

Real Japan




Anyone who knows Japan even a little will have visited Tokyo, or the temples in Kyoto, but what about the rest of the country? They very rarely get a mention, but we think it’s the people and places off the regular route where Japan’s real treasures are to be found.

For the pilot, we went to Shodoshima, a small island in the Inland Sea in central Japan, to visit a 200-year-old kabuki theatre, traditional soy-sauce and noodle factories, and Xerom, where they make minute, cutting-edge components for your camera or smartphone. And we stayed with the delightful Sasaki family, who have farmed on the island for generations.

Its creators are asking viewers to leave suggestions about locations for future episodes.